In this thread: expand the street racing lexicon

Discussion in 'Automotive' started by Shotgun Chuck, May 8, 2017.

  1. Shotgun Chuck

    Shotgun Chuck
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    So I have too much free time and a rather active imagination. As a result, I've come up with a lot of slang for people, places, and things you'll see out on the road. The problem is, no one else is going to know what I'm talking about. So I made this thread, where you can add your own ideas. Let's try to make these go mainstream, or something.

    Donut: Cop bait. Someone who attracts unwanted attention via reckless, careless, or otherwise less-than-circumspect behavior. Examples of such behavior include crossing solid center lines, going too fast in residential areas (esp. at night), running excessively loud exhaust (likely to generate more complaints and can act as a homing beacon for cops who would otherwise have been completely unaware), weaving in and out of heavy traffic, blabbing race locations or good roads, and posting racing videos on the internet too soon, without sufficient censoring, or with too much geographical information.

    "Dude, that Subaru driver is such a frickin' donut. I hope his gross sounding straight pipes don't wake everyone up and get us reported."
    "That guy in the Golf? Total donut. Don't run him unless you want your license plate on YouTube within the hour."

    Road Muggle: Someone who is unschooled in the fine arts of driving and believes that the purpose of driving is the destination only, rather than the journey itself. Typical characteristics of a road muggle include a preference for automatic transmission, a fear of or dislike for racing in general because it's dangerous, a fear of curves resulting in excessively slow speeds, and, at least in the United States, a tendency to end up in SUVs.

    "What the dang is with this road? Even at 10PM, I get stuck behind some road muggle going 10 under through the best curves!"

    Road Wizard: Someone who is schooled in the fine arts of driving.

    "Did you see the way he took that curve? Pure artistry, right there. Total road wizard."

    Muggle Cut: The act of cutting the center on an outside corner (right-hand corner in the UK, Japan, and other left-driving countries, left-hand in the rest of the world) despite going well below the speed limit. For some reason, pickup truck drivers seem particularly prone to this behavior. Can also result from attempting to use racing eye technique on an unfamiliar road or one where the center line has been mostly worn off; needless to say, you should try not to do this.

    "Yeah, I was up on Gold Cord Pass and I had some dude in a Ram going 35 and muggle cutting all over the place. What a waste of a detour."

    NMT: Short for "non-motorized traffic", i.e. bicycles and pedestrians. Less of this is better.

    "This road would be better than the Transfagarasan if it didn't have so much NMT."

    Rig Racer: A crazy trucker trying to make up time. Possibly a result of companies trying to optimize and sub-optimize and sub-sub-optimize their supply chains without making sure that what they're asking for is actually physically possible.

    "I was up on Puritan Pass the other day and I almost got run over by a rig racer."

    Walking Dead: A subset of NMT; people who walk or bike where it is not safe to do so, such as on extremely narrow shoulders, on the shoulder of a busy road or one with poor visibility ahead, or even in traffic lanes. The worst I've seen so far is a woman I call "stroller lady", who walks along the shoulder of a narrow, curvy, hilly 55 MPH road pushing a stroller and letting her family sprawl out across half a lane.

    "Sorry, I'd rather not push it through Cottonwood Forest. Too many walking dead."

    Dandy: Someone who has a fancy car, but doesn't know how to drive it.

    "I took my S14 up to Rochelle's Lake and blew the doors off a Ferrari 458. What a dandy!"

    Muggle Magnet: A tourist trap or other traffic attractor placed on or at the end of a road that could really use less traffic.

    "Yeah, of course this road has a muggle magnet, they all do. There used to be a mine at the top, but the state operates it as a park now."

    Weeaboo Camaro: Nissan Skyline R32/33/34, when driven in the United States.

    "I keep seeing this Weeaboo Camaro up on Gold Cord Pass. I don't know what he thinks he's doing there; he's got that thing way too low for such a rough road."

    Weeaboo Foxbody: Toyota AE86, when driven in the United States.

    "There's this Weeaboo Foxbody on Craigslist right now, guy wants 10 grand for it. 10 grand! Is he high?!"

    Tenerife AE86/Canary Islands AE86: BMW E30, apparently the most popular drift car in the Canary Islands (and probably all of western Europe anyway).

    Magic Box: Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution

    Scraper: A stupidly low car that struggles with surface imperfections even a Corvette or Lamborghini could breeze over.

    "Wow, so many scrapers out here lately. You'd think they'd learn sooner or later."
     
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  2. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    Muggle cutting is actually advised by institute of advanced motorists in the UK, though I like these terms.
     
  3. CreasingCurve

    CreasingCurve
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    Considering the way you talked to me when i said that i cut corners, i think this describes you quite well @Shotgun Chuck
    Please dont get butthurt.
     
  4. Shotgun Chuck

    Shotgun Chuck
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    I am butthurt about it. There's a difference between being a danger to oneself, and being a danger to innocent bystanders. If you're crossing solid centers, or abusing passing areas that shouldn't be there (I know a few like that), you've crossed from the former to the latter. I'm sorry, but there is no foolproof way to tell when a car is coming around blind corners or over crests. Headlights on the guardrail? Trying to rely on that is how ended up drifting right past an Army cop about a year and a half ago. Headlights on the telephone wires is one I've heard, but that only works if there's telephone wires right next to the road (on many, there aren't). Running with the windows down? If you're really caning it, your combined exhaust and wind noise will probably drown out anyone who's coming the other way until they're fairly close. Just relying on a lack of traffic at night seems to me like pure Murphy-baiting lunacy.

    Also, Mulholland racers never cut the center and no one ever called them muggles. Several of them went on to some success on the track, actually. The "cat-and-mouse" style of battle was probably invented on Mulholland, so the racers could determine victors without needing to use both lanes.

    Some further.

    YOLO: 1. A reckless and probably immoral tempting of fate. Mentally, probably works on the same "it'll never happen to me" principle that allows people to center cut and still sleep at night. Frequently performed by donuts.

    "I can't really tell if there's anyone on the other side, but YOLO! *rips parking brake*"

    2. A car or modification that has no rational reason to exist (at least from a racer's perspective), but is used or performed anyway just because it's cool.

    "Yeah, I could have LS swapped my Fiero, but it wouldn't have generated even half as much interest as a Super Duty 4. It's a YOLO swap."
    "If we're just talking YOLO cars now, I'd take a Ford Capri with a Cosworth DFV engine. It'd be expensive, and probably not reliable, but I think I can safely say no one has ever done it before."
     
    #4 Shotgun Chuck, May 9, 2017
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  5. CreasingCurve

    CreasingCurve
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    Yes i may be taking risks but i do so because i have enough information gathered concerning my surroundings or possible traffic ahead.
    I do not cross the centre line over a crest, that is one of the stupidest f****** ideas.
    I drive with windows down and usually in a high gear below like 4000, so with a low hp car and factory exhaust system, car noise is not a problem.
    When i drive at night the radio is either off or very low.
    When i do cross, it is ALWAYS when i can see atleast 50+ metres ahead or when i know that i can rely on the headlights of possible cars due to reflection off guard rails or other surroundings.

    You treat crossing the lines as an excuse for those who do not have the skill to drive fast between the lines, rather than the skill that is needed (both observation and car control wise) to be one who can use the whole road to go faster.

    And why do you keep referring to these, "Mulholland racers" as some sort of gods. Driving fast between the lines is not hard, all it requires is some good tyres, a light-ish car and a knowledge of the road.

    "Trying to rely on that is how ended up drifting right past an Army cop about a year and a half ago"
    Sounds like you have great car control.
     
    #5 CreasingCurve, May 9, 2017
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  6. Shotgun Chuck

    Shotgun Chuck
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    Because, unless you count the moonshiners, they pretty much wrote the book on mountain street racing. If they didn't need to cut, no one does. If you're racing someone, there are ways to determine a victor without cutting. If you're flying solo, the tenths you gain by cutting aren't going to matter anyway. Leastwise, that's how I see it.

    Better than you think. I was on a road that leads to a ski resort, but it also cuts through an Army base because that's just how the area ended up being set up. There's a section with four tight hairpins. I was coming downhill, and saw no lights on the guardrail, so I hit the brakes and Scandi-flicked it in thinking I was clear. I never crossed out of my lane and had a very good drift going until I finally saw lights... and a pushbar... and a light rack.... and the shape of a Chevy Impala. Even when I panicked and stomped on the brakes like a complete dingus, I went toward the inside shoulder, not the oncoming lane, and I still didn't lose the back end.

    Fortunately, MP Dude had no idea I was crossed up on purpose and thought the icy road had got the better of me.
     
  7. Shotgun Chuck

    Shotgun Chuck
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    Bump!

    Canary Islands Crazy House/Alaska Driveway: A house built right up against the frickin' road so if someone steps out of their door or backs out of their garage at the wrong moment, you'll clobber them before you even know they're there. Variants include a staircase/porch hidden by a corner of the house, a high fence/wall (with or without gate) that's right on the road, an access road rendered blind from the worst of the two directions by one of its buildings being right on the main road, or just a hidden blind driveway. Common in the Canary Islands, hence the first name, but can show up just about anywhere where steeply undulating terrain is common. "Alaska Driveway" refers specifically to the "hidden blind driveway" variant and some roads here are practically made of them, for about the same reason.
     
  8. MrAnnoyingDude

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    The Skyline is not a Japanese Camaro. As a fast version of a normal family car, it's closer to a Japanese Chrysler 300 "letter series".

    And the AE86 is more like a Plymouth Duster/Dodge Dart Demon - a fancier version of a normal compact.
     
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  9. Shotgun Chuck

    Shotgun Chuck
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    Congratulations, you had to do some real digging to find this one. In any case, the "weeaboo Camaro" comparison came from their sports models having similar power output and form factors, and both standing as a representative of sorts for their type of vehicle.

    As for the AE86/Mustang comparison, that was based on the surprising number of visual and mechanical similarities between the two. Both FRs based on something more pedestrian, both had stick axles out back and both had four-link setups to go with. Both were available as hatchback and (more rigid) notchback coupes, though the Mustang also had a convertible. When seen in profile, they have similar lines as well.
     
  10. nosraenyr kcirtap kcin

    nosraenyr kcirtap kcin
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    Cowboy Cadillac: A Chevy El Camino or a Ford Ranchero (Also Dodge Rampage but nobody cares about that)
    "The last time I been to a trailer park there was Cowboy Cadillacs every where."

    Black Trash Camaro: A donked Camaro.

    White Trash Camaro:
    A matte black and lifted Camaro.

    Detroit Vibrator: A Chevrolet tractor.

    Poncho: A Pontiac.

    ShakeyLiner/Freightshaker: A Freightliner.

    Portable Parking Lot/Mobile Parking Lot: A car hauler.

    Baboon Butt: A Kenworth T2000
     
    #10 nosraenyr kcirtap kcin, Mar 5, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2018
  11. MrAnnoyingDude

    MrAnnoyingDude
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    Douche Coupe: A performance car bought for showing off, often modified in a garish way and driven badly.
     
  12. JBatic

    JBatic
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    There are a ton of those over here, most of them where built in the 1700's
     
  13. MrAnnoyingDude

    MrAnnoyingDude
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    What were they thinking? That the locals are invincible from horse carriages?
     
  14. JBatic

    JBatic
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    Back then it was a narrow dirt road and they had a front yard
     
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