1. GPU Fatal Error? Intel HD Graphics 620/630 Crashes? Help us solve them!
    Dismiss Notice

Question about U.S. Buses

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ai'Torror, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. Ai'Torror

    Ai'Torror
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,786
    Hi!
    Since I'm not american, could those of you who are tell me if U.S. Uses non articulated 3 axle city buses?
    Similar to this one:

    I've tried doing some research, but I did not find any Low Floor 3 axle U.S. Buses.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. ManfredE3

    ManfredE3
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2016
    Messages:
    1,881
    I've never seen one aside from sightseeing busses in a city
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. EcoNadder77

    EcoNadder77
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    May 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,114
    I believe this is a bus in Florida that has what you are describing.
    megabusinFlorida.jpg
    Since it is a double-decker, I think it is safe to assume it uses a low floor chassis design.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Ai'Torror

    Ai'Torror
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,786
    Hmm interesting, but Is is due to some law, or are they just too big? I've found a few high floor coach style buses, but no Low floor ones. I am debating if I want to create one for BeamNG, but I do not know if a bus like that would even be legal to drive in the U.S.
    --- Post updated ---
    I know about the Double-deckers, but are they using a single deck versions? (You're already making a double decker and you did not respond to the PM, so I'm kind of looking for ideas)
     
  5. MisterKenneth

    MisterKenneth
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2016
    Messages:
    2,193
    It's possible, I did find this picture after doing some research.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. Ai'Torror

    Ai'Torror
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,786
    I know about the Double-deckers, but are they using a single deck versions? (You're already making a double decker and you did not respond to the P
    Hmm interesting, It looks like sort of a hybrid between a city bus and a coach. It is low, but It doesn't look like full on low floor bus. I'm calling it good enough. Thanks guys!

    Oh and do you know what model bus is that?
     
  7. MisterKenneth

    MisterKenneth
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2016
    Messages:
    2,193
    I think it's a Neoplan. Probably an AN440.
    --- Post updated ---
    What about these?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Ai'Torror

    Ai'Torror
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,786
    I like the design of those, but they are full on coach style buses, which I'll be trying to make, but not now. I want to start with easy stuff first. Then I'll try to make a coach, as model wise it will be simple, but It will require a major Jbeam Redesign, while this one will only require me to add a few nodes and only about 100 beams.
    --- Post updated ---
    Okay, next question about the 3 axle buses :p
    Would this kind of tag axle be used? (Steerable and liftable tag axle)

    Or would it be better to just take the Front Suspension and spin it around 180 degrees and change the steering linkage for hydraulic rams?
     
  9. YellowRusty

    YellowRusty
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2016
    Messages:
    1,226


    I can confirm this - that's a Neoplan AN440 "suburban" - produced for long city-to-suburbs commuting routes. You can read more about the Neoplan AN440 here.
    This was essentially a German bus that was transplanted over to the USA

    The photos came from here.

    The author of the above article describes the central axle as a "tag axle", which is odd, given that "tag axle" is usually defined as "a dead axle located behind a drive axle". However, given the fact that the central axle has only single wheels, I'm willing to bet that the Neoplan simply had a dead axle ahead of the rear drive axle. Because of the fact that the rearmost axle is outfitted with dual tires, I'm guessing that it's the same, non-steering drive axle as the regular Neoplan AN440 buses. Placing a steering axle directly in front of a non-steering axle would have been useless, so I'm willing to bet that the middle axle is there solely for weight distribution.

    The size of the fenders also makes me think that it wouldn't be a lift axle either, but I can't confirm this.

    You could try reaching out to the author of the article above (there appears to be a space to do so at the bottom of the page - note that commenter "Larry" mentions having driven with the tag axles), or contacting Neoplan's headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany via here.

    I should also note the existence of the AN3403.
     
    #9 YellowRusty, Apr 10, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
    • Informative Informative x 1
  10. Ai'Torror

    Ai'Torror
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,786
    Okay, next question about the 3 axle buses :p
    Would this kind of tag axle be used? (Steerable and liftable tag axle)

    Or would it be better to just take the Front Suspension and spin it around 1
    Thanks! That is quite a lot of useful info.
    I'm debating over a setup with powered mid axle and steerable rear tag axle, but that setup could make routing the driveshaft a bit harder.
    My biggest problem right now is finding the space for said axle. With current space between the axles it would need to be mounted in the rear with airbags and shocks on top.

    I'm thinking about mounting this:

    but spun 180 degrees. The only part that concerns me are the pivot points mounted in the rear, would they cause problems during braking as the axle would then push on them instead of pulling like it does normally?
    --- Post updated ---

    Surprisingly, the front suspension setup would actually fit in the rear.
     
  11. mfaughnan57

    mfaughnan57
    Expand Collapse

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    47
    Powered mid axle is definitely the way to go, as the turning radius on a non-steering rear axle would be pretty bad, especially for a city bus. Also, if you are going to take the front axle and put it on the rear, make sure you limit the steering angle of the rear axle. Keep up the great work on this!
    -edit-
    To answer a question you had a little earlier on, the majority of busses with the powered mid axle do have a liftable, steerable rear, as shown here:
    maxresdefault.jpg
     
    #11 mfaughnan57, Apr 10, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
    • Agree Agree x 1
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice