Scarpa Ledano Series 1 &2 (1974-1995) 1.0

Four door italian sportscar by Scarpa; Teneros Big brother

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    Since the late 60s, Scarpa had customers wishing for a more practical model, some even wanting a four door car. Scarpas new CEO in 1970 liked the idea of a Family Scarpa with room for golf equipment and so the development of the Ledano began.

    In 1974, the original two variants were the Ledano 3000, with a 260hp 3l V8, a specific new version based on the new V8 family also planned for sportscars, and the 3500, that has kind of an odd place, as it was nowhere called 3500 besides the engine bay and the papers, the 3500 upgrade was just an option like heated seats, the back still says 3000. The 3500 has 0.5 l more displacement and a nastier sound aswell as a locking rear diff in this config. It makes a bit over 300hp. screenshot_2021-08-08_12-11-13.png

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    The new SCVo3000GV engine in the S1 Ledano 3000
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    The 1974 3500
    In 1975, Scarpa got a special customer asking desperately for a V12 engine, but as Scarpa had killed the plans for a new V12 during the 74 oil crisis, the 4500 V12 used basically two of teh new V6 engines that were still in developement, but with a blcok twice as long/with double the cylinders and with a not really ideal carburator setup, that would be in production until 1987. The original customer ordered ten of these cars, Scarpa kept it as a really expensive option in production and made roughly 150 more of them. with the 400+hp 4.5l V12, it was in 1975 the fastest and most powerful sedan on the market and with fuel consumption of 25-35l/100km combined (approx. 6.5-8 mpg!!) it certainly was one of the most thirsty cars.
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    V12 Ledano in its natural habitat: The gas station. Range with this engine is just about 200km on a good day.
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    In Italy, there was a luxury tax for cars with more than 2000cc displacement, so companies like Ferrari and Maserati aswell as Scarpa developed smaller turbo engines for their cars. Scarpa just shrunk the newly developed V6 they made for the smaller Tenero and in 1980, with the first Ledano facelift, they just swapped the 3000 engine for the 2000 biturbo from teh Tenero, for Italy only though. The 3000 itself got discontinued, teh 3500 replaced by the 3800 with electronic fuel injection and the 4500 V12 staying in production without the facelift. The 1980 facelift, barely noticeable, is mostly a new and improved suspension setup, better breaks and a better gearbox. Major changes were not made until 1987.
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    The Biturbo 2l V6 from the Tenero
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    In 1987, Scarpa released the Ledano II, that was just a big facelift with a new and improved suspension construction and a new setup.
    It also got new engines:
    The 2000 BiTurbo got a really small 2l V8 Biturbo instead of the Tenero V6, in order to have those two cars less close together. Also, the new V8 has more torque from the start cause more cylinders and a really nice sound to it.
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    1987 Ledano II front end.
    The 3800 got overworked to make more power and less pollution with catalytic converters etc.

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    SCVo3800Eb-2ic Engine from a Ledano II 3800

    The 4500 V12 with carburators and the Series one body got finally discontinued and replaced by a 4.3 l V8 veriant with about the same power of 430hp
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    In 1995, the Ledano III came out with a completely new body.
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