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(Building Instructions!) My BeamNG.drive LEGO Cars

Discussion in 'Videos, Screenshots and other Artwork' started by DriftinCovet1987, Jun 3, 2017.

?

What car do you most want me to build next?

Poll closed Jun 8, 2017.
  1. Hopper

    30.0%
  2. Bolide

    25.0%
  3. Pigeon

    5.0%
  4. Grand Marshal

    22.5%
  5. Burnside

    17.5%
  1. carlover416

    carlover416
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    #61 carlover416, Feb 24, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
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  2. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Joined:
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    Messages:
    860
    So, after a long, long while, I'm back in action building Beam LEGO cars, everyone.

    1987 Ibishu Pigeon Base

    Being my personal favorite vehicle in BeamNG.drive (even more than the Covet), this little diesel truck has been a vehicle that I've attempted to built many times over the years. These are a few of my older designs:



    All of them are essentially the same techniques scaled up or down, but one thing that's bothered me about my 2016 4-wide Pigeon design (left) is that unlike the 5-wide (center) and 7-wide (right) builds, I never had the space to really get all the details I wanted without making the vehicle into a complicated, static, fragile, and/or expensive design. In trying to get the signature pointy nose of the Pigeon, I ended up with basically a box that didn't really cut it for me when it came to keeping parts count (especially the rarer clear pieces) down. Since the 7-wide Pigeon I built in October of that year, I haven't attempted another build of this vehicle since that time.

    So, what did I do with my sideways front design?

    I turned it sideways again. At the front, I used four 2*2 brackets to mount the sides from the bed forward horizontally. This allowed me to use two more 2*2 brackets for the (forward-facing) front fascia. These brackets (combined with four plates) not only gave this new Pigeon the style that it needed, but also a lot more strength from the bracing offered by the grille and bumper connecting the front brackets (and thus the entire front half) together.
    GEDC0065.jpg
    I decided to eliminate the brackets I used on my older versions, instead choosing to simply build the rear end all studs up.
    GEDC0066.jpg
    Not much on the side. I planned to include a mirror here, but I figured that would be a bit too large for this scale.
    GEDC0067.jpg
    The front and rear again.
    GEDC0068.jpg GEDC0069.jpg
    The underside. Notice the offset front wheel; that was a mounting technique I had to use, as I had neither the space nor the parts for a proper front wheel.
    GEDC0070.jpg

    1959 Autobello Piccolina 110

    The Pigeon and the Piccolina have a surprising number of similarities - both are mid/rear-engined, rear-wheel-drive; both are agonizingly slow from standard; both are cheap, budget-oriented transportation for their respective nations; and both come with monstrously-overpowered versions that are complete deathtraps surprisingly fast. However, unlike the Pigeon, this one was actually fairly easy to make. After building a rough draft Corse version, I decided to tackle the slowest and cheapest trim of this little Italian pickle: the 110.

    The front was something which I thought I had messed up on, but it turns out that I got it freakishly accurate considering I was working with LEGO bricks - things which are historically not that accurate in small scale.
    GEDC0100.jpg

    The rear...is the rear.
    GEDC0102.jpg

    The side profile.
    GEDC0103.jpg

    The front and rear again.
    GEDC0104.jpg GEDC0105.jpg

    So different yet so alike.
    GEDC0107.jpg
    1975 Bruckell Moonhawk Detective Special

    Like the Pigeon, this car has also gone through quite a few modifications since I last built two examples of it in 2016.


    This first one is quite the mess, to be honest. It barely even looks like a Moonhawk - more like a cartoon Barstow than anything else.

    This second one got much closer - but the front was still a bother to be. I couldn't have the Moonhawk's pointy grille while having a flush side profile - and that was a problem, especially when my other muscle cars could regularly achieve a flush side.

    And that's where this new version comes in. Instead of all the wild side profiling and 4.8-stud width, this Moonhawk's built exactly 5 studs wide and mostly studs-up. Far simpler, but also far more effective.

    Front-side-rear-herpderp.
    View attachment 543272 View attachment 543273 View attachment 543274 View attachment 543243 View attachment 543244 View attachment 543245

    And that's it for now.
    --- Post updated ---
    So, after a long, long while, I'm back in action building Beam LEGO cars, everyone.

    1987 Ibishu Pigeon Base

    Being my personal favorite vehicle in BeamNG.drive (even more than the Covet), this little diesel truck has been a vehicle that I've attempted to built many times over the years. These are a few of my older designs:



    All of them are essentially the same techniques scaled up or down, but one thing that's bothered me about my 2016 4-wide Pigeon design (left) is that unlike the 5-wide (center) and 7-wide (right) builds, I never had the space to really get all the details I wanted without making the vehicle into a complicated, static, fragile, and/or expensive design. In trying to get the signature pointy nose of the Pigeon, I ended up with basically a box that didn't really cut it for me when it came to keeping parts count (especially the rarer clear pieces) down. Since the 7-wide Pigeon I built in October of that year, I haven't attempted another build of this vehicle since that time.

    So, what did I do with my sideways front design?

    I turned it sideways again. At the front, I used four 2*2 brackets to mount the sides from the bed forward horizontally. This allowed me to use two more 2*2 brackets for the (forward-facing) front fascia. These brackets (combined with four plates) not only gave this new Pigeon the style that it needed, but also a lot more strength from the bracing offered by the grille and bumper connecting the front brackets (and thus the entire front half) together.
    GEDC0065.jpg
    I decided to eliminate the brackets I used on my older versions, instead choosing to simply build the rear end all studs up.
    GEDC0066.jpg
    Not much on the side. I planned to include a mirror here, but I figured that would be a bit too large for this scale.
    GEDC0067.jpg
    The front and rear again.
    GEDC0068.jpg GEDC0069.jpg
    The underside. Notice the offset front wheel; that was a mounting technique I had to use, as I had neither the space nor the parts for a proper front wheel.
    GEDC0070.jpg

    1959 Autobello Piccolina 110

    The Pigeon and the Piccolina have a surprising number of similarities - both are mid/rear-engined, rear-wheel-drive; both are agonizingly slow from standard; both are cheap, budget-oriented transportation for their respective nations; and both come with monstrously-overpowered versions that are complete deathtraps surprisingly fast. However, unlike the Pigeon, this one was actually fairly easy to make. After building a rough draft Corse version, I decided to tackle the slowest and cheapest trim of this little Italian pickle: the 110.

    The front was something which I thought I had messed up on, but it turns out that I got it freakishly accurate considering I was working with LEGO bricks - things which are historically not that accurate in small scale.
    GEDC0100.jpg

    The rear...is the rear.
    GEDC0102.jpg

    The side profile.
    GEDC0103.jpg

    The front and rear again.
    GEDC0104.jpg GEDC0105.jpg

    So different yet so alike.
    GEDC0107.jpg
    1975 Bruckell Moonhawk Detective Special

    Like the Pigeon, this car has also gone through quite a few modifications since I last built two examples of it in 2016.


    This first one is quite the mess, to be honest. It barely even looks like a Moonhawk - more like a cartoon Barstow than anything else.

    This second one got much closer - but the front was still a bother to be. I couldn't have the Moonhawk's pointy grille while having a flush side profile - and that was a problem, especially when my other muscle cars could regularly achieve a flush side.

    And that's where this new version comes in. Instead of all the wild side profiling and 4.8-stud width, this Moonhawk's built exactly 5 studs wide and mostly studs-up. Far simpler, but also far more effective.

    Front-side-rear-herpderp.
    GEDC0083.jpg GEDC0084.jpg GEDC0085.jpg GEDC0087.jpg GEDC0088.jpg

    And that's it for now.
     
    #62 DriftinCovet1987, Apr 20, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2019
    • Like Like x 9
  3. calvin1390

    calvin1390
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    Covet can you make that gavril suv
     
  4. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    860
    I'm not sure about the Roamer...right now, I'm planning on building other things before tackling that vehicle. The Roamer's never been one of my favorite vehicles, and by the time I'm done building the vehicles I do like, I might not have enough pieces to build one.

    Speaking of vehicles that I like that I've built, here are two more:

    1953 Burnside Special V8 Manual:

    Being my favorite drift car in the game by a long ways, and one of my general favorite vehicles to drive around in, the Burnside's always been a car that I enjoy re-creating.



    I built two different versions of this old sedan in 2016 that were basically the same vehicles with different hoods. These were very studs-sideways builds that relied upon a building style that I had then-recently released, but they also had a clever rear fender method that I later used in other 4-wide vehicles.

    I've even made this InkScape vector drawing of this car (admittedly, it's not proportionally accurate, but it looks rather similar in places like the rear fender and the front end).

    And now I've gone and built this sedan again.

    The front. Unlike my older designs, this Burnside is almost completely studs-up (save for the rear fender) and exactly 5-wide in the front half. This allowed me to capture details like the grille indicators and shape, the space between the hood and headlights, and the fender blinkers that I wouldn't have been able to on my older models.
    GEDC0109.jpg

    The rear. Fairly unchanged, except that I lost the tail lights and gained a mild tail fin effect with those rail plates over the rear fender.
    GEDC0112.jpg

    The side. This was fairly hard to pull off, as I had difficulty adapting my new structure to the old fender style. While my first version of the rear fender (right) might look acceptable, it makes the Burnside look way shorter; the new fender (left) is far more proportionately accurate.
    GEDC0113.jpg GEDC0078.jpg

    The front and rear again.
    GEDC0114.jpg GEDC0115.jpg

    Here, you can see that this Burnside is actually two sections (the front part 5-wide, the rear end 4-wide with extensions) sandwiched together, like the Barstow. This was the only way I could get the rear end the way I wanted it to be while maintaining the 5-wide front end. This isn't the strongest design (it's fairly weak) but it works well enough for me.
    GEDC0116.jpg GEDC0117.jpg


    GEDC0119.jpg

    1981 Gavril T65 Fifth Wheel Upfit (short frame):

    Since I've built the smallest vehicles in the game (the Pigeon and Piccolina), the oldest (the Burnside), and one of the cheapest (the Moonhawk), I've also taken on one of the largest vehicles.

    The T-Series has always been one of the most menacing vehicles in Beam: a massive, 7-ton+ beast with hundreds of horsepower and enough speed, maneuverability, and acceleration to take down many of the slower cars (and even some of the faster ones). This example, the T65 short-frame, is the smallest, lightest, and least powerful of the lot. It's basically the Lotus Elise of T-Series trucks. But that doesn't make it any less scary to deal with in demo derbies and chases.

    Picbarf:
    GEDC0123.jpg GEDC0124.jpg GEDC0125.jpg GEDC0126.jpg GEDC0127.jpg GEDC0128.jpg GEDC0129.jpg GEDC0130.jpg GEDC0131.jpg

    The T-Series might seem like a massive vehicle, but it actually isn't much longer than your average large American car. (The Moonhawk is about 14 studs long, while the T-Series is 16 studs long.)
    GEDC0135.jpg

    Most of its size (and quite a bit of its weight) comes from its width and height.
    GEDC0136.jpg

    However, it's almost two Piccolinas long (9.4 studs vs. 16 studs), and its width (at 6 studs) takes up more than 60% of a Piccolina's length.
    GEDC0137.jpg GEDC0138.jpg
     
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  5. Mullethead

    Mullethead
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    Looks like I'm not the only one who did some sort of interpretation with the Burnside in one way or another. Well done!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Thanks!

    Anyway, I've been building a few more cars during the hiatus where I ran out of camera batteries. (This isn't all of them; I still have two more to photograph and show off.)

    1988 Ibishu Covet Race

    My namesake vehicle was a car that I just had to build. And what better version than the Race-tuned variant, a truly excellent race car, one of the grippiest vehicles in the game, and the best autocross car for under $15,000?




    Of course, this isn't the first time I've built the Covet in LEGO. In fact, I've built two - one 4-wide, and one 8-wide. While the 8-wide was very accurate, I've always felt that the 4-wide wasn't quite there yet. It always seemed a bit too tall and ungainly to be really called a Covet replica (especially in the roof).

    Hence why I went for a shorter roof with my new version of the Covet.

    This is the front. For those with an eye for detail, you'll notice that I used an upside-down 1x4 bracket on the bumper to replicate the front splitter.
    DSCF7001.jpg

    The rear. This is where I had a bit of trouble trying to get the rear window, the hatch, and the spoiler to look accurate and detailed whilst keeping them in scale. Here, I used the same trick for the lower hatch as I did for the front splitter, only in reverse.
    DSCF7002.jpg

    Front-side-rear-herpderp.
    DSCF7003.jpg DSCF7004.jpg DSCF7005.jpg
     
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  7. Alex_Farmer557

    Alex_Farmer557
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    miramar when?
     
  8. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Soon (tm).

    In the meantime, I've been building a few of my cars in LDD to compare them directly to my older models, and the difference is surprising.

    BurnsideSpecialOldvsNewlxf.png
    Compared to the very blocky and unrefined 2016 Burnside (left), the 2019 Burnside (right) looks like it was made by a completely different builder. Sure, the rear fender treatment is similar, and the roof is the same, but the front's far more realistic and fleshed-out on the 2019 version.

    GavrilGrandMarshalOldvsNewlxf.png
    The 2016 Grand Marshal (left) almost looks like an '88 Pessima compared to the 2019 GM (grey). The 2019 GM uses far fewer "rare" parts (those which are either hard to find or don't come in many colors, like the 1x1 brackets on the 2016 model's headlights), as well.

    And then we get to the rear, where things get interesting.
    RearGavrilGrandMarshallxf.png
    Unlike the 2016 GM, which mounts its lights sideways in the middle of a giant sideways sandwich, the 2019 GM looks far more realistic with its upright lights and sleek bumper. Also, the 2019 GM uses 111 pieces, which is far more than the 94 the 2016 GM uses.
     
    #68 DriftinCovet1987, Apr 28, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
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  9. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    I've been building my Beam cars in LDD recently, and here are a few more renders :

    GavrilT-Serieslxf.png
    The Gavril T65 Short, 191 pieces

    WentwardDT40Llxf.png
    The Wentward DT40L, 506 pieces

    I have quite a few more renders coming, so stay tuned for those.
     
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  10. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    After several weeks of work, I've finally completed all 24 BeamNG.drive cars in LEGO.
    BeamNGdriveCarsGroupShot2lxf.png
    All 24 of them in one shot, sorted from oldest to newest.

    27825578483_7f6dd2af47_n.jpg
    All 15 of the original cars from 2016 in an old group shot.

    And then eight of the vehicles in little groups that you can see clearly without a microscope.
    SportsCoupeslxf.png
    The sports coupes, from left to right: Civetta Bolide, Ibishu 200BX, Hirochi SBR4, and ETK K-Series.
    LargeSedanslxf.png
    The large sedans, from left to right: Burnside Special, Gavril Grand Marshal, ETK I-Series, and ETK 800 Series.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. BannedByAndroid

    BannedByAndroid
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    Love the dedication on the making of your Lego builds.
     
  12. SuperShep1

    SuperShep1
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    oh brickrigs love that game
     
  13. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Thanks! I am very dedicated to my LEGO building, as it's something fun I can do at any time I want to.

    That's cool and all, but I haven't had much fun with Brick Rigs. Far too slow on my little laptop on the lowest graphics settings and in singleplayer, even compared to Beam (and I'm not going to talk about my multiplayer experience).

    AutobelloPiccolinalxf.png HirochiMusicaFictalxf.png
    Anyway, here's a couple renders of the Piccolina and the Hirochi MusicaFicta piano.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  14. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Alright...I have a very serious question to ask. After what went down in the Kickstarter thread, I'm not sure if this is an appropriate question to ask, but...

    Would anyone be up for buying virtual instruction PDF files for these vehicles for about $0.50-5.00 for individual vehicles, along with separate prop packs and whatnot? I've been working on a couple of virtual instruction booklets recently, and I think that that's the closest I can get to giving people Beam merchandise. Think of these instruction booklets like my way of giving you these...


    (made by LJ Designz here)

    ...but they're about 1/48 scale instead, and you get to build them and easily modify them, too.

    I know there are a couple of you out there who wouldn't mind paying for them, but I want to gauge interest before Of course, I'll have to do all this selling on my own site, as I can't do any of it on the Beam forums, but this would be a sort of stopgap between the virtual Beam cars and real model cars. (They'd only be instructions, though; no way am I paying tons of money for shipping just to give someone something they could build themselves.)

    Mind you, I'm only considering doing this; don't get your hopes too high.
     
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  15. zestyfolfdude

    zestyfolfdude
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    I would love that.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    BeamNGdriveCarsGroupShot3lxf.png
    Since 0.17 just released, I figured I ought to give everyone a status update on my website.

    Yes, I'm still working on it, and I hope to get it to a working state soon. Before you ask, I already have made the Bluebuck out of LEGO.
    GavrilBluebucklxf.png
     
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  17. TobiBenzi

    TobiBenzi
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    Wow, I completely forgot about this thread as the alerts stopped giving me an alert for it... Assumed it was dead. Turned out it is not!
    Your cars look very good, and realistic as well. I especially like the Burnside and the Wentward. The Burnside's front looks exactly like it's "real-life" counterpart.

    This reminds me that I should continue my own car-building in LDD sometime... Always wanted to recreate a six-wide Burnside, I-Series, and now, Bluebuck.
    I prefer the six-wide style over four studs personally, because I find that you can fit the right amount of detail, but also still make it have a realistic scale which you can put anywhere and which even fit in a city. And also because I love the design of Lego City Undercover's cars, especially the performance cars. Have you seen those by chance?
    They used some clever techniques there.
     
  18. DriftinCovet1987

    DriftinCovet1987
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    Thanks! I also really like the Burnside - it's been one of my favorite builds of all time ever since I created the first version in 2016, and it's only gotten better since I rebuilt it a few months ago. Why, it's so good that it served as the basis for my Bluebuck design, and I'm sure that I've used the rear fender technique on a multitude of '50s American 4-wide cars.

    Well, if you want any reference images for those builds, hit me up in a PM. I've got tons of them for just about everything from the Pigeon to the Wentward.

    I can understand that; however, I find the challenge of the four- and five-wide scale more attractive, and the smaller sizes of my vehicles makes them easier to test and develop with real bricks.

    Also, yes, I have seen the LEGO City Undercover vehicles, but I feel those are a bit too simplistic for my tastes. I'm sure that if I ever built six-wide BeamNG vehicles, they'd be quite a bit more complicated than their Undercover counterparts (as I like to get every curve and detail I can in my larger cars, rather than falling back on rudimentary techniques).
     
  19. TobiBenzi

    TobiBenzi
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    Ohh, thank you! I might just do that if I start up LDD again sometime in the future. What really interests me is the internals, as I can see the externals quite well, but the internals are often quite hard to find out.

    About the scales, I can see that, as especially working with an odd number of studs like 5 or 7 is always challenging with Lego. Especially if you change it within the vehicle from even to odd I imagine, like in the burnside with 4 in the rear and 5 in the front

    The LCU cars often rely on more special pieces, that's right. Also some "printed" ones which don't exist. Or in colors that aren't available for these pieces, or only very rare and too expensive.

    I really liked your old big white I-Series as well btw. It looked quite realistic imo. The small one's great too though!
     
  20. arquanin

    arquanin
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