What do you guys think?

Discussion in 'Videos, Screenshots and other Artwork' started by Harkin Labs Gaming, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. Harkin Labs Gaming

    Harkin Labs Gaming
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    So I made this video, and would like to know if how to improve my drifting.
    Any feedback is appreciated
     
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  2. LeSpecialist01

    LeSpecialist01
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    the best is to build your own config, drift steering rear stock grip front sport or race grip, alot of power and a controler or steering wheel with a handbrake mod:)

    here a video of me drifting maybe you can learn from this as you can see my gas-brake-handbrake-clutch% message me if you need some help i might be able to help you, sorry if my english is not to good :)

     
  3. Harkin Labs Gaming

    Harkin Labs Gaming
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    Thanks for the advice. I agree about making my own setup, and would like to try playing BeamNG with a wheel again. I remember it was easier to control the car, but I haven't gotten a chance to use mine because I swapped to a glass desk (I tend to manhandle the wheel, so it would probably shatter the desk). I also discovered that my main issue with drifting was turbo lag. My method for drifting is different from a lot of others because I don't use the handbrake and only clutch kick in emergency situations where the car starts to understeer. But again thank you very much for the advice.
     
  4. atv_123

    atv_123
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    Everyone that learns how to drift on their own will have a different style of how to drift. For instance, LeSpecialist01 up there uses a lot of handbrake to initiate his drifts and then mostly controles them with the throttle and is very good at it with his own custom setup. (nothing wrong with that by the way, I am just about to make a point that we are all different)

    Me, on the other hand... I don't even know where the button is. I never use it and the way that I usually drift, there just really isn't a need.

    The way I set up most of my cars is usually pretty simple. Take a naturally oversteer car like the 200BX, give it a fair amount of Normally Aspirated power (important to me for control), and then proceed to tune the car for understeer.

    WHAT?! UNDERSTEER?! DO YOU EVEN KNOW WHAT DRIFTING IS?!

    Yeah yeah, I get that a lot, but here is my reasoning for doing so. In a decently powered RWD car, with a large amount of throttle, it will kick the rear end out whether you have an oversteer setup or not. Great for drifting. In an understeer tuned car, the car will naturally only want to go in a straight line and do anything to get back to that straight line. Great for control.

    So what I do is use the car's weight to naturally throw the car out of balance either through a scandinavian flick or otherwise. Mostly, I normally have just enough power to keep the rear tires sliding with the throttle almost matted in my chosen "drift gear"... which is almost exactly as it sounds... my chosen gear for drifting. When more throttle is applied, it is easier to control the amount of power going to the wheels than a massively overpowered car that can kick out the rear in any gear. Plus, with that lack of extra power, it makes it easier to keep from binning it backwards into a tree.

    Anyways, about that understeer. The car is sliding now, so how does that help? Well, the way I normally control the car is to actually break the front tires loose as well. When your car is an understeer setup, if its sliding it will actually want to snap back to going straight rather violently. So, to keep the front end from coming round, you give the car less countersteer to end up dragging the front end into the corner. Once you have the car at the angle you want, just keep turning in until the front end breaks loose as well. now you can really drag your steering wheel around without having a profound effect on how much your front traction is changing.

    Interestingly, in this case, the sharper the corner, the more you will want to countersteer the car so that you can regain traction back from the sliding front wheels. Have a much wider sweeping corner? Use almost no countersteer at all and have the front totally loose with the rear.

    Now you might be thinking this method is interesting, but why on earth would you do it? What are the advantages?

    Well, again, it's all down to personal preference.

    When learning to drift, I could get everything spot on but the exit of the corner... I don't know why, but I would always get that twitch from the rear end regaining traction and could just never control it. I would always snap back the other direction because my front wheels were still in countersteer and pretty much just end up killing the car.

    With the way I have my cars setup now though, most times when your coming out of a corner, you have almost no countersteer by that point. That makes it much easier to spin the wheel and catch the car from flying off in the wrong direction. Rather than a full rotation, I might only have to spin the wheel about a quarter turn or less. Add to that that the car naturally wants to be going in a straight line anyways and right there you have yourself set up for an easy corner exit. When that time comes, you can just apply full throttle and just slide right back into traction with all 4 wheels... almost like exiting a corner with a high powered AWD rally car on dirt except we are in a mid powered RWD car on pavement (most likely).

    Now there are shortcomings to this method. Fast transitions are one of them. If you are trying to drift close S Curves, you have to be very brave with the cars weight and be REALLY willing to throw the car around. Reason being is because 9 times out of 10 when your coming out of a corner with this setup, your going to grip up which would normally mean that you have to do another semi lengthy drift initiation into the next corner. This means to make successive chained drifts, you have to have some serious transition momentum built up to get the rear end over that grip zone... granted, if done correctly, this can be tons of fun.

    Second shortcoming is tires. With this setup we are sliding ALL 4 WHEELS as opposed to just the rears. This means that in real life where tire wear is an actual problem... this can get expensive... even more so than regular drifting. Buuuut, luckily, that's not something we have to worry about yet in Beam ;)
     
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  5. LeSpecialist01

    LeSpecialist01
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    hey i noticed to the rev limiter drop to mutch soo try this mod :) the rev limiter is not the same

    https://www.beamng.com/resources/b18c4-vtec-engine-pack-new-stuff.3120/
     
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