Your Personal Micro Blog(s)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tdev, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    Smooth scroll is awful, has to be clicky for me.
     
  2. aljowen

    aljowen
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    My mouse is very rarely in clicky mode, it only finds itself there if i play a game that uses the scroll wheel. Other than that it is free scroll for me all the time. On a webpage i can be just as accurate with it smooth and it also means i can flick around web pages with ease.

    On topic:
    Got that help system fully implemented. Looks fairly nice in my opinion too.
     
  3. argilla11

    argilla11
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    Just been painting my office and playing Dying Light.
     
  4. BlueScreen

    BlueScreen
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    I really hate smooth scroll. It's utterly useless and annoying for games, but even for web browsing it's terrible. It's way too sensitive.

    Whe browsing, I use middle click (open in new tab) a lot. With a clicky wheel, it's fine. With a smooth scrolling wheel though, it might scroll a tiny bit up or down, and when I middle click it misses the link and goes into mouse scroll mode instead. If I then move the mouse a slight little bit, the whole page scrolls up/down a lot and it's annoying as fuck.
     
  5. aljowen

    aljowen
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    Your personal blog post for tomorrow should read along the lines of you improving your button pressing skills. You would have to be in a JML advert to have that much difficulty.
     
  6. BlueScreen

    BlueScreen
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    It doesn't happen very often, but when it does, it makes me wanna throw the damn mouse outta the window.
     
  7. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    Most (not all) of the mice I've used without a clicky scroll have been even worse than that. The scroll wheel has still triggered in a similar fashion to a clicky wheel at predefined points rather than being a true continuous scroll. You essentially have a clicky scroll without the tactile feedback. Pukeworthy is what that is. Horrid and vague to use. Thankfully only had that on non gaming mice, true continuous scrolling is much better, clicky better still.




    On topic. Been playing wolfenstein the new order, amazeballs.
     
  8. Dummiesman

    Dummiesman
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    Doing some software 3D rendering in GDI+
    (not done whatsoever with GPU ;) )

    (imported from here)
     
  9. aljowen

    aljowen
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    I felt somewhat compelled to make this video, what has my life came to xD.



    Also my mouse is of the type where it still acts like a stepped scroll while in smooth scroll. I guess that must be why i have never had any middle click issues. I also use middle click all the time, smooth scroll does not effect my ability to use it at all.



    I was hitting the wrong buttons by accident and still had no issues. I am surprised i dont have the RSPCA at my front door after treating the mouse like that. This is why i had no idea how it was possible for you to have issues.
     
    #89 aljowen, Feb 2, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 21, 2015
  10. Kitteh5

    Kitteh5
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    Your hand are so feminine. :3 Also, I have never tried smooth scrolling. Seems rather weird. I like scrolling with my arrow keys on my laptop, and with the little steps because I scroll every few lines at a time.
     
  11. CaffeinatedPixels

    CaffeinatedPixels
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    I use clicky scroll all the time. Smooth scroll is just too weird. Since I found the middle button (which will also open multiple instances of a program in the taskbar) it's all I use.

    Only function for smooth scroll is to fling to the top of the page if need be.
     
  12. n0ah1897

    n0ah1897
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    I use smooth scroll only in Skyrim because it takes an endless amount of scrolling to zoom out in third person.
     
  13. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    #firstpersonmasterrace



    I am sat in the most boring lecture in history
     
  14. aljowen

    aljowen
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    Perhaps it would be more interesting if you were listening to it rather than posting on forums :p

    What is it about?

    Started using my new calculator today. I upgraded from a Casio fx83es to a Casio fx991es plus. I can use my calculator to factorize as well as use it for numerical integration, as well as differentiation. It can even add numbers too... Shame that my exams dont feature all that many numbers.
     
  15. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    Ajax with an incompetant fool who seems incapable of operating a slideshow.

    I want an RPN calculator. They aren't cheap though.
     
  16. aljowen

    aljowen
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    Didn't know what RPN was, googled it, still have no idea beyond the fact that it is a different way of entering numbers into a calculator. Im perfectly happy with my new calculator for my needs but i would really like a curta calculator.

     
    #96 aljowen, Feb 3, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 21, 2015
  17. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    Aren't you studying computer science? Reverse polish notation/postfix is usuallytaught. Definitely was on the aqa syllabus when I did it.

    Computers have no concept of order of operations (bidmas, bodmas etc, brackets overheads division multiplication addition subtraction). Reverse polish notation by its very structure forces us to account for the order of operations when writing out a sum or equation. There is no order of operations, you can simply read it left to right and be done with it. Also happens to be that its dead easy to parse it in code. There are algorithms for converting infix (what we usually use) to RPN too, compilers usually read arithmetic through these first (poorly in Javas case) and output RPN machine code.


    I use realcalc as my calculator on android (rarely use my actual calculator these days), I happen to have it set to RPN mode. If I wanted to work out 5*2+3 I would hit 5 enter 2 multiply 3 plus (5 2 * 3 +).
    I've also written a few expression parsers before.
     
  18. aljowen

    aljowen
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    So essentially you enter the numbers first, then you enter the operation that you wish to perform on them after that. It then calculates from left to right regardless of operations that are used?

    I am currently doing OCR A2 computer science, just checked, RPN is not on the specification.
     
  19. SixSixSevenSeven

    SixSixSevenSeven
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    3 6 * 3 - 92 + 4 /

    from right to left.

    3, then 6, then multiply. 18.

    So we are left with 18 3 - 92 + 4 /

    18 then 3, subtract. 15.

    15 92 + 4 /

    goes to 107 4 /
    26.75

    Every operator works on the previous 2 operands (so the * works on 3 and 6). If one or maybe both of those operands are themselves operators then it sort of chains on so instead of using the result of that operand directly you start again and calculate the result of its previous 2 operands and use that. so the -, its previous 2 operands are * and 3, so you cant subtract 3 from *, you instead calculate the 3 6 * which results in 18 leaving you with 18, 3 - which you can calculate.


    In code. Best way of working it is to use a stack (OCR must at least cover those right :p)

    Split the above sum up into tokens (easiest way of doing that is probably to just split the string into an array or list of strings wherever a space occurs as a crude method, then whenever arithmetic is required on the tokens you simply cast them to an int). So the array would probably be somewhat like this: ["15", "92", "+", "4", "-"].
    Index 0 in an array is of course always the leftmost, so then you can loop from 0 to arraylength-1 to gradually read each token 1 by 1.
    As you read them, if the token is a number you push them to your stack, else if its an operator (+ for example) you pop the last 2 items from the stack, perform that operation and push the result onto the stack. By the end you should be left with just 1 item left in the stack, that is your answer.



    Code:
    function RPN() {
        var stack = new Array();
        var input = document.getElementById("postfixNotation").value;
        var ops = input.split(" ");
        var stringPos = 0;
        while (stringPos < ops.length) {
            //alert(ops[stringPos]);
            var token = ops[stringPos];
            
            if (token % 1 === 0) {
                stack.push(token);
                //alert(token);
            }
            else {
                var result;
                var Op2 = parseInt(stack.pop());
                var Op1 = parseInt(stack.pop());
                switch (token) {
                    case '+':
                        result = Op1 + Op2;
                        break;
                    case '-':
                        result = Op1 - Op2;
                        break;
                    case '*':
                        result = Op1 * Op2;
                        break;
                    case '/':
                        result = Op1 / Op2;
                        break;
                    default:
                        break;
                }
                stack.push(result)
            }
            stringPos++;
        }
        alert("Result is: " + stack.pop());
    }
    
    my token % 1 === 0 is a quick trick in javascript for confirming if a token is an integer or not. Javascript also allows mixed type lists. I was going to use a python script I have but I cant find where I saved it, its a bit easier to follow than random JS i pulled from an assignment.

    http://www.eng.nene.ac.uk/~13426422/Stuff/RPN.html
     
  20. aljowen

    aljowen
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    That makes sense. We do indeed cover stacks.

    Its a fairly interesting way to do maths, while im not sure i would go as far to switch to using it in my daily life since i am very accustomed to putting brackets on everything it does seem like a very good way of doing things

    In case you are interested this shows the spec broken down by the same topics as the spec does: http://www.learningcomputing.co.uk/ALevelComputing/f453-advanced-computing-theory


     
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